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By John Charalambakis

Let me state it from the beginning: This Greek referendum is absurd simply because the government has failed its people, and also because the troika’s boneheaded mentality did not allow her to cut a deal with the previous government last fall (if the latter had taken place we wouldn’t be facing the potential chaotic situation now). In addition, the Syriza government is asking the people to vote on a proposal that is not even on the table.

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by Lord Alton

The Islamic State terrorist attack, in which almost 40 holidaymakers were killed in Tunisia, accompanied by atrocities in France and Kuwait, highlights again the murderous outrages the group is willing to commit. Christians have been in the firing line of the IS terrorists and other terror groups in the Middle East and the rest of the globe.

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by Federico N. Fernández

Alexis Tsipras has repeatedly praised the way Argentina handled its 2001 economic crisis. The current events in Greece, unfortunately, seem to be a déjà vu of the Argentinian collapse. Now that the Syriza administration has imposed capital controls and flirts with default and euro Grexit, a proper assessment of the Argentinian crisis might be needed more than ever.

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   By John E. Charalambakis

Theories are not extracted from history. On the contrary, theories are needed in order to interpret history. Economic phenomena are ordered in accordance to definite laws. Understanding the relationships among economic variables is pivotal in assessing forthcoming risks and potential responses to those risks. The recurring economic structures help us comprehend fundamental relationships and, as Carl Menger taught us, economics is the study of universals apprehended in a realist manner. The economic and financial symptoms we observe are rooted in a fundamental cause called behavior of the objects involved. Unless we comprehend those objects we will keep fighting symptoms with steroids, recycling problems, and creating economic and financial crises. →']);" class="more-link">Continue reading

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by Enrico Colombatto

An attempt by the European Commission to harmonise tax policy across all European Union countries could scare off business based in Europe. It could also deter entrepreneurs and long-term investment as Brussels bureaucrats crack down on international companies who look to benefit from the different tax regimes in various EU countries.

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scandinavian

 The recently released book Scandinavian Unexceptionalism shows that the leftist idealization of Scandinavian welfare policies is flawed. In fact, the Scandinavian experience is a great case for limited government and free markets. Scandinavians countries are not prosperous due to large welfare states, but rather as a combination of free-market policies, social cohesion and nordic norms. In fact, Scandinavian countries had high living standards, long lifespans and equal income distribution before the transition to high-tax nations.

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By Sydney M. Williams

With his encyclical, “Laudato Si” (Be Praised), the Pope stepped into the quagmire that is climate change. While it is a theological treatise, he joined his infallible voice with those who regard man as the principal cause of climate change. He placed blame on the “developed” world, by which he means the English-speaking nations, Western Europe and Japan. He wrote: “The exploitation of the planet has already exceeded acceptable limits and we have still not solved the problem of poverty.” There was no mention that capitalism and democracy have done more to reduce poverty than anything else, including religion.

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By Roland Fritz

A few days ago, the Centre for Global Prosperity (CGP) at Hudson Institute presented a study that evaluates how easy it is to engage in philanthropic activities in different places of the world, thereby comparing 63 countries.

Generally speaking, there is a relatively clear relationship between a country’s GDP and the opportunities for philanthropy in it – that is why rich countries like the Netherlands, the United States and Canada lead the ranking.

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by Michael Wohlgemuth

Many challenges face UK Prime Minister David Cameron if he wants to keep the UK in a substantially reformed European Union. Some EU-reforms under the labels ‘flexibility’, ‘competitiveness’ and ‘democratic accountability’ are negotiable and would benefit the EU as a whole. This would help to win the EU-referendum for the ‘in-camp’. But British voters would also look at the economic and political consequences of the UK leaving. These depend on what arrangement the UK would be able to negotiate with the EU after an ‘out’ referendum. There are more likely to be economic net-costs of Brexit and, politically, Brexit could trigger another referendum in Scotland on whether to leave the UK.

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by John Charalambkis

Rembrandt’s painting portraying the return of the prodigal son is an amazing and monumental piece of art. It signifies the most joyful moment of reuniting a family and starting a new chapter/direction in everyone’s life. No matter how many times someone has seen the original s/he cannot refrain from seeing it again at the Hermitage if they happen to be in St. Petersburg. I have a copy in my living room, and I often go close by to see the amazing hands of the father-figure in the picture. Here is a closer look at those hands:

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