More Mises

Of the most well-known Chinese economists, few have advocated laissez-faire market economics so strongly, and so unstintingly, as Zhang Weiying. Zhang is one of an academic minority in China who subscribe to non-Keynesian principles, and has thus been labeled by the media as “spokesperson for vested interest groups,” and even, on more than one occasion, “an enemy of the people”… In the early 1990s, Zhang’s studies at Oxford University, from which he emerged with a PhD, further strengthened his belief in a self-regulated free market. He became an admirer of Ludwig Mises, a prominent proponent of the so-called Austrian School of economics emphasizing individual choice and price signals controlling the marketplace with minimal government intervention.

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by Richard Ebeling

One of the greatest huddles to a successful achievement of liberty in society is all due to the little word, “but.” People will often say, “Oh, I believe in freedom in principle, but . . .” That “but” is followed by an assumed exception requiring some form of government intervention, regulation, or redistribution.

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by William Pesek

If there’s any likely winner from China’s unprecedented clampdown on Hong Kong, it’s Singapore.

All the tiny city-state needs to do to attract the giant banks, hedge funds and multinational firms currently clustered in Hong Kong is sit back quietly as Beijing’s henchmen do their worst. The firing of teargas at peaceful demonstrators over the weekend marked a chilling assault not just on Hong Kong’s civil liberties, but on the city’s economic future.

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by Jeffrey Tucker

After F.A. Hayek died in 1992, a magazine commissioned me to do a final tribute to his life and work, summing up his main contributions. It was supposed to be a for a popular audience. There’s nothing like such a writing assignment to reveal how much you actually know — or do not know — about a subject.

Getting into the task, I thought it was going to be a snap. I covered his biography and politics just fine, mentioned his business cycle studies, and his work on capital theory.

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by Jeff Thomas

The Libertad is a Mexican coin that was first issued in 1981 in .999 fine gold and then in silver in 1982. Beginning in 1991, the Libertades became the only coins in the world that were issued in the convenient sizes of 1/20, 1/10, 1/4, 1/2, and 1 ounce—again, in both gold and silver. This made them very practical if they were to be used as currency.

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by Sydney Williams

Pundits in mainstream media and politicians everywhere deplore the lack of ethics in banking, business and sports. They are right to think so. Corruption, cronyism and lobbying for special tax breaks and regulation, designed to limit competition, are not habits or characteristics that should be abetted, or even abided. The financial collapse in 2007-2008, like a receding tide, revealed the debris of fraud that had become all too common in the banking industry. Domestic violence has no place in sports or anywhere else; it should be unacceptable in any civilized society.

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by Sydney Williams

They arrived on five hundred and fifty diesel-polluting buses and carbon dioxide emitting planes. Three hundred thousand paraded in the streets of New York in a People’s Climate March that was organized by Bill McKibben, co-founder of 350.org. It was a rally against man-caused climate change, but also included those who were demonstrating against fracking. (Keep in mind, it has been lower natural gas prices, a consequence of fracking, which has allowed the U.S. to take the lead in reducing emissions.)

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by Anthony Caprio

In order for a civilization to function there are certain pillars, which are required. The first pillar is security, which is needed to protect lives and property, and to provide stability. The second is laws or contracts that define behavior and resource use. The third is some form of judicial system to arbitrate the disputes that inevitably arise between individuals and groups. Zonas de Empleo y Desarollo Economico (Zone for Employment and Economic Development) or ZEDE is a project being implemented in Honduras as an attempt to create an autonomous city with a separate judicial, legal, and security system from the rest of Honduras.

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by Joe Carter

Wearing masks and bulletproof vests and with guns drawn, police in Orange County, Florida conducted the SWAT-style raid. Although the team included narcotics agents, they weren’t conducting a drug bust. They weren’t looking for illegal weapons or stolen merchandise either. They were on a mission to see if barbers were cutting hair without a license:

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