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by Sandy Ikeda

I would like to share some thoughts on how the size of government can influence the effectiveness of the principle of the rule of law.

The rule of law does not mean, as it is often interpreted to mean, that ordinary people should obey the decrees that government issues. Rather, it means that laws should serve to promote the general welfare and so should not aim to harm or benefit particular persons or groups. Think of a speed limit on a highway that applies to and is equally enforced upon all motor vehicles.

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by Sydney Williams

In one of the great rhetorical reaches of all time, Financial Times columnist Edward Luce recently wrote of the paradox that America’s first Black President has presided over the biggest drop in African-American wealth since the Great Depression – a true statement. However, he added the following: “By no honest reckoning can Mr. Obama be blamed for the decline in black America’s fortunes. Yet the facts are deeply unflattering.” It read like an apology, but I am unsure to whom.

The facts are not just “unflattering,” they are condemning. Under Mr. Obama’s watch, the rich have become richer and the poor, poorer. Asset prices have boomed, while wages for non-white households have declined 10%, since 2009.

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by Joseph Dobbs

The Umbrella Revolution has shown that Hong Kong’s democracy is subject to Beijing’s ultimate power. The student-led ‘peaceful’ protests turned ugly as police cracked down on demonstrators calling for greater democracy. Beijing has become increasingly impatient. Tensions in Hong Kong have been created by divergent interests between Hong Kong’s economic tycoons advocating loose ties with the mainland and the city’s youth, fearful that economic benefits will not extend to them. But few now are optimistic about the city’s democratic prospects, writes GIS guest expert Joseph Dobbs.

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by Todor Papic

For any student of liberty, the passing of an intellectual giant like Professor Leonard Liggio (October 14th 2014 at age 81) comes as a truly sad day.

To any young libertarian he was a monumental figure, yet a very humble man with an open heart. More than one brief encounter would normally allow, I was moved by Prof Liggio’s openness and kind disposition. At the time I knew only part of his accomplishments, as he casually conversed with me about some of the most interesting encounters during his long career in campaigning for liberty. As I am starting to learn more about this great man, I cannot help but admire his devotion to freedom and humility in it.

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annaby Anna Ntaiana Kotsaki

Internships are an important experience for today’s college students and recent graduates. But not every opportunity is equal. Many internship programs out there do a wonderful job preparing students for their first entry-level job—while others leave something to be desired.

Just because the world of internships is becoming more competitive does not mean you should take the first opportunity you’re handed. Instead, there are several factors that need to be evaluated before accepting an internship opportunity:

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Free Market Road Show 2010

© Britt Schier – Austrian Economics Center

 On 28 October 2014, the Austrian Economics Center (AEC) will be hosting a Gala evening in celebration of the Next Generation‘s Mobility program and the recipient of the 2014 Hayek Lifetime Achievement Award, Deirdre N. McCloskey.

The Next Generation Mobility program was created to promote entrepreneurial thinking and an understanding of key economic issues among Austrian students aged between 11 and 19. The program was launched in 2010 by the AEC in collaboration with the Friedrich A. v. Hayek Institute and generous local sponsors, and has since grown into an incredibly successful program that continues to inspire the next generation of economic thinkers and business leaders.

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by Richard Ebeling

Suppose that there was a button in front of you that if you pushed it would, in one instant, abolish all the governmental controls and regulations on the U.S. economy. Would you push that button, and transform America into a society of free men associating with each other on the basis of voluntary exchange, with government limited to protection of life, liberty and honestly acquired property?

There are many people today who speak about the heavy-handedness of government, and its increasing stranglehold on people’s freedom and the country’s potential renewed prosperity. They often cogently demonstrate the failure and corruption of political manipulation of society. And they say the “private sector” is the key to real and lasting solutions to our social problems.

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by Robert P. Murphy

This short video, put out by the Million Jobs Project, currently has more than 3.7 million views. It claims that US producers have been outsourcing jobs abroad in order to fatten their profits. It urges viewers to increase their purchases of American-made products by 5 percent, since this shift would ultimately create “a minimum” of a million new jobs for Americans. Unfortunately, everything about this video is wrong.

In the first place, the video takes for granted that it is a good thing if an American gets a job at the expense of a foreigner. After all, the whole point of urging viewers to spend more money on American products is that this will cause “insourcing.”

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AEC_LogoInternational Coalition Letter

We, the undersigned taxpayer and free market groups, and individuals support tax autonomy and oppose any regional or international tax changes that include “harmonizing” tax rates or introducing new taxes. Such schemes have been proposed through the European Union (EU), the United Nations (UN) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

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by Samuel Gregg

William Shakespeare knew a thing or two about human psychology. But he also understood a great deal about the body-politic and how small signs can be indicative of deeper traumas. So when Marcellus tells Horatio at the beginning of Hamlet that you can almost smell the weakness permeating Denmark, it’s Shakespeare’s way of telling us to pay attention to what sticks out as abnormal and to ask what else it may portend.

It was difficult not to be reminded of this advice when reading that a majority of Germany’s Ethics Council recently called for the abolition of legal constraints upon incest.

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