BIS1by John E. Charalambakis

In the most recent report from the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) – the central bank of the central banks- we observed one the clearest divisions between the accommodative/coordinated policies of the most important central banks and the opinion of the BIS. The latter is warning of potential dangers in the global economy due to the over-accommodative policies, and emphasized that the central banks in their zeal to overcome the Great Recession may be ignoring the concept of financial cycles.

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by Jan Winiecki

Here we go again, straight into the old debate as to from what the poor benefit more: growth or redistribution. It has been rekindled by the near simultaneous appearance of two books written by Indian economists. I think I am justified in calling professor Jacques Dreze an (honorary) Indian, given his attachment to that country (even if I definitely do not share his and professor Amartya Sen’s prescriptions…).

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by Tyler Cowen

Income inequality has surged as a political and economic issue, but the numbers don’t show that inequality is rising from a global perspective. Yes, the problem has become more acute within most individual nations, yet income inequality for the world as a whole has been falling for most of the last 20 years. It’s a fact that hasn’t been noted often enough.

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by Sydney Williams

Asininity is a common malady of the political class. Nevertheless, one of the more moronic examples I have seen was a letter by Treasury Secretary Jack Lew to House Committee on Way and Means Chairman Dave Camp on July 15th. In the letter Mr. Lew argues we should fence in American corporations, calling for “a new sense of economic patriotism.” He argues that American companies, in being responsible stewards of their owner’s wealth, are “effectively renouncing their citizenship.” That was a curious metaphor for an Administration that argues, in cases like Citizen’s United and Hobby Lobby that corporations are not individuals. To whom is owed a corporation’s primary loyalty – the government of the United States, or their shareholders, customers and employees?

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by Adrian Moore

I have lived in California for 52 years, save a few when the Army stationed me elsewhere.

I could fill pages and pages with lists of things I love about California, including the incredible natural beauty up and down the state, cool history, awesome ethnic enclaves of every type, fun cities and peaceful mountains.

But, on July 1, I am moving out of California, with regrets but without second thoughts. This state is simply no longer a desirable place to live for my family.

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by Stewart Dompe and Adam C. Smith

Joesph Stiglitz, 2001 Nobel laureate in economics, wants to revitalize industrial policy through greater government intervention in favoring certain technologies over others. Stiglitz correctly points out the importance of learning and technological development in economic growth, citing such luminaries as Joseph Schumpeter and fellow laureate Robert Solow in defending his position that industrial policy is a productive tool for states in both the developed and developing world.

Stiglitz’s emphasis on development through innovation and technology is noteworthy if for no other reason than it shows that mainstream economics is finally moving beyond archaic models of development, where the panacea for developing nations was to airdrop “shmoo” capital upon an economy and wait for the catch-up effect to lift them out of poverty.

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by Sydney Williams

America is about protecting the rights and freedoms of its individual citizens. In doing so, it allows them to pursue their dreams within the confines of a society that functions under the rule of law, without fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, sex or political affiliation. A government that is comprised “of the people, by the people, for the people” is, by definition, more concerned with individual liberties than administrative efficiency. As such, it has long served as a beacon for the aspirant. We all know of stories from the thousands of men and women who came to these shores with nothing but a few dollars to their name, yet who stayed, saw needs, worked hard and built fortunes.

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by Martin Vlachynsky

The “Flat Tax Era” in Slovakia came to a definite end on 1st January 2013. Corporate tax rate of 23% (highest in the whole Central and East European Countries region by the way) became valid instead of the 19% rate. This was considered to be the last nail in the flat tax coffin. The flat rate used to apply to all personal income, corporate income and VAT until 2011, when 20% VAT (described as a “temporary crisis measure”) and 2013, when 25% personal income tax rate for high earners were introduced.

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by Richard Ebeling

In the minds of many people around the world, including in the United States, the term “capitalism” carries the idea of unfairness, exploitation, undeserved privilege and power, and immoral profit making. What is often difficult to get people to understand is that this misplaced conception of “capitalism” has nothing to do with real free markets and economic liberty, and laissez-faire capitalism, rightly understood.

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