So what can the US Learn from Europe? Watch this interesting panel discussion to find out!

For the very first time, Free Market Road Show hits the American soil on November 11 in Lubbock, Texas. The panel discussion organized by The Austrian Economics Center and co-sponsored by The Free Market Institute focused on the European economic and political experience following the onset of the international financial and economic downturn. Each speaker addressed different aspects and what caused the crisis and the role that government fiscal, monetary and regulatory policies have played in prolonging – and, in some cases, worsening – economic conditions throughout the European Union and in countries on the periphery of the European Union.

Dr. Barbara Kolm discussed the impact of labor laws and regulations on unemployment among the general working population and, in particular, young men and women in European countries. “Overregulation of the labor market and minimum wage destroy opportunities for the young generation and lead to high youth unemployment,” said Dr. Kolm.

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by Frank Shostak

Economists have always been envious of the practitioners of the natural and exact sciences. They have thought that introducing the methods of natural sciences such as a laboratory where experiments could be conducted could lead to a major breakthrough in our understanding of the world of economics.

But while a laboratory is a valid way of doing things in the natural sciences, it is not so in economics. Why is that so?

A laboratory is a must in physics, for there a scientist can isolate various factors relating to the object of inquiry.

Although the scientist can isolate various factors he doesn’t, however, know the laws that govern these factors.

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by Zac Tate

The rouble has weakened by 50% against the dollar this year, 22% this month and 11% yesterday, leading the Central Bank of Russia to raise interest rates today to 17%. The rise comes amidst a backdrop of falling oil prices, the effects of geopolitical sanctions and the growth of protectionist trade policies.

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by Richard Ebelling

A specter is haunting the world, the specter of two percent inflationism. Whether pronounced by the U.S. Federal Reserve or the European Central Bank, or from the Bank of Japan, many monetary central planners have declared their determination to impose a certain minimum of rising prices on their societies and economies.

One of the oldest of economic fallacies continues to dominate and guide the thinking of monetary policy makers: that printing money is the magic elixir for the creating of sustainable prosperity.

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by Jeffrey Tucker

People are rioting in the streets, bombs are falling on innocents, we get daily reports of torture and massive human suffering. What can we do?

We can make bread.

Bread is the oldest symbol of what it means for human hands to create things rather than destroy them. When you make bread, you realize the dream of how human action can exceed and even defy the sum of its parts. Bread feeds rather than destroys, delights instead of demoralizes, reveals the new rather than wallows in the old.

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by Sydney Williams

War is never pretty. In fact, as General Sherman (who would have known) once declared, it was Hell. In the history of the 87th Regiment of the 10th Mountain Division, the regiment in which my father served in World War II, Captain George F. Earle wrote that after Nazis pretended to surrender and then killed their intended captors, “Company C (my father’s company) took no further Prisoners of War.”

In an act of war on September 11, 2001, a group of nineteen Islamic terrorists killed three thousand people in three strikes against the U.S. Further attacks were widely expected.

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by Peter St. Onge

The debate whether or not cryptocurrencies are “money” has put a spotlight on the Menger-Mises Regression Theorem. As stated, the theorem posits that a non-fiat money must have had value before it became a money. Some have used currencies’ lack of antecedent value as knocking it off the money pedestal or as forcing cryptocurrencies to ignominiously piggyback on fiat currencies’ own regressions.

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by Karen Horn

Most people like to walk down to the farmer’s market to get some vegetables. Doing one’s groceries at the market feels a bit as if the countryside has come to town, and with it the good old days. The market stands are small, the produce is alluring, the farmers have wrinkles in their face and honest dirt under their fingernails. People love the market. This market. The market however, i.e. the more abstract market, associated with capitalism, doesn’t seem to have a similar warmth to it at all.

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by Sandy Ikeda

Today, the difference between law and order and rule of law is literally a matter of life and death. Rarely has that difference been illustrated so starkly as on the streets and inside the courtrooms of St. Louis County, Missouri, and Staten Island, New York. The tragedy is that too few can articulate it; the terror is that too many can’t even see it. At least, not yet.

Rule of law

The rule of law is often contrasted with the rule of man. According to the rule of law, law should lie as far as possible beyond the arbitrary, unpredictable choices of public authorities.

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by Sydney Williams

Racism is the belief that innate differences among different races determine individual outcomes. As a belief, it has been discredited. As practice it violates an individual’s civil rights. Like prejudice, its persistence reflects society’s moral turpitude.

Prejudice can be defined as preconceived opinions that are not based on reason or experience. It cannot be corrected through legislative actions. Prejudice is cultural and usually ingrained. It comes in many flavors. There are xenophobes, misogynists, anti-Semites and racists, among others. Such feelings are primarily a function of ignorance, but they also reflect a culture that lacks empathy and mutual respect.

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